Category Archives: Current Campaigns

Are We Losing The Heart of Michael? The Selling Off Of Neverland And What It Means For Us

"I Will Never, Ever Sell Neverland....It Represents The Totality Of Who I Am."
“I Will Never, Ever Sell Neverland….It Represents The Totality Of Who I Am.”

I will resume my series on Michael’s work in relation to Langston Hughes’s “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain” soon, but for now, circumstances have once again intervened and required a detour. Late Wednesday, shock waves were sent throughout the fan community by a statement from the Michael Jackson estate. It is with a heavy heart that I begin this post today.  First of all, here is the official statement that came late Wednesday night:

You will soon be reading news reports stating that Colony Capital has decided to sell Neverland. As the property manager, they have the right to do this. The Estate has issued the following statement in response to a media request for comment:

We are saddened at the prospect of the sale of Neverland which, under the agreement negotiated during Michael’s lifetime, Colony has the right to sell. The Estate will maintain Michael’s family home in Encino, including its iconic recording studio there. We continue to build upon Michael’s legacy as an artistic genius and humanitarian through his music and new projects such as the Michael Jackson ONE show in Las Vegas. We hope and trust that any new owners of Neverland will respect the historical importance and special nature of this wonderful property. Michael’s memory lives on in the hearts of his fans worldwide.

It is also important to the Estate that Michael’s fans understand that although the Estate has no right to stop or obstruct the sale, The Estate did explore a number of potential options for Neverland with Colony but zoning, financial and land use restrictions limited the alternatives and ultimately Colony made the decision to sell.

MJOnline
The Official Online Team of The Michael Jackson Estate™

In an apparent attempt to assuage concerns and accusations that the estate had not “done enough” to preserve its stake in Neverland, another statement was released on Thursday:

MJ Estate Additional Info- Last night, we sent you a message from the Estate regarding Colony Capital’s decision to sell Neverland. Many of you have inquired about the Estate purchasing Neverland. As you know, the Estate does not disclose the details of its business dealings but last night’s statement to the fans (not included in the comment to press) states “the Estate did explore a number of potential options for Neverland with Colony” but for the reasons stated none of those options were feasible. This sentence was included specifically for your benefit to let you know that the Estate tried to find a way to keep the sale from happening but for a variety of reasons, it was not possible. Zack O’Malley Greenburg broke the news in Forbes shortly after we sent you the Estate’s statement: http://www.forbes.com/…/michael-jacksons-neverland-is…/. He offers some further insight you might find helpful in understanding the situation. Like you, the Estate is sad and disappointed by Colony’s decision. Michael’s legacy is in his music, in his humanitarian efforts, and in his spirit. The Estate hopes that whomever the new owners may turn out to be, that they will continue to appreciate the property not only for its beauty but for its historical and cultural legacy as well. MJOnline The Official Online Team of The Michael Jackson Estate™

No sooner had the news broke, then the heated battles were waging on social media between the usual factions of estate haters vs.supporters. It all comes down to a few key questions: Just how much interest DOES the estate really have in Neverland, and are they being forthright in their claims that every feasible avenue was indeed exhausted-or is it, as some are claiming, a case of unburdening a troublesome asset that has little financial incentive or priority for them? OR is it all a big bluff? These questions are ones that are being raised everywhere at the moment, and the answers are as varied and complex as every aspect of Michael Jackson’s life. The full details of Michael’s 2008 deal with Colony Capital, which prevented foreclosure of Neverland and allowed him to maintain a stake in the property-but with the understanding that Colony Capital would maintain the full right to sell-may be best left to those with more legal expertise to unravel. For the layperson, Zach O’Malley Greenburg’s article, linked to in the above statement, may be a good place to start but it still leaves many questions as to whose interests are being best served. And perhaps it is a legal web I will best leave for those who have, as I said, more expertise with which to unravel it. What is known with certainty is that Michael Jackson, contrary to popular myth, never “gave up” Neverland. True, he never had a desire to live there again after the 2003 raids and the trial, although it has been said that he was also acting on the advice of his attorney Tom Mesereau who had warned him that he would never be able to live there again even if he wanted to; that Sneddon and company would continue their mission to drive him out.

neverland2But the truth is that even though Michael Jackson never again physically lived at Neverland after 2005, he never gave it up, either. Rather, he fought valiantly to keep it-or at least, to maintain some measure of control over it on paper-just as he fought throughout the last years of his life to maintain all of his valuable assets.  He could have easily sold the property in 2008, or earlier, and perhaps alleviated at least some of his financial headaches. But apparently, maintaining Neverland, and keeping it in his name, was important to him. Important enough to fight for it. What were his eventual plans for the property? We may never know for certain. It doesn’t seem likely that he ever intended on living there again. In fact, he had already set his heart-and his sights-on a luscious property in Las Vegas that he intended to purchase from the profits of This Is It and transform into his new vision-Wonderland.

Michael’s new “dream home” was said to be this Las Vegas property. He intended to purchase it from the proceeds of “This Is It”:

[tube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l0MV7-pfqT8[/tube]

[tube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQbKYZWtpNQ[/tube]

But Neverland had been too hard won, and as he had told us, represented the totality of who he was. Having put his whole heart and soul into Neverland, it was not something he could easily just walk away from. Perhaps it represented too much for him to be able to just give it up. The big question is: Did Michael, in his efforts to hang onto the property, get suckered into a bad deal? I have seen a lot of talk to that effect. Basically, the terms of the agreement that Michael signed to in 2008 would be what passed into the hands of the estate after his death. As much as we might fault Michael (or shoddy advice from Tohme) about signing an agreement that gave Colony Capital the right to sell at their discretion, there are still a number of factors to keep in mind. My understanding is that Michael maintained an 87.5% interest in Neverland (with Colony Capital maintaining a smaller 12. 5% interest) which, upon his passing, would have reverted to his estate. If true, this would mean that any decision to sell would have to be a mutual decision of both parties. The key, however, may be in a 2003 decision to  initiate a non-renewal option on the Williamson Act, which until then had protected Neverland-just as it protects all agricultural California landowners-from massive tax liability, provided the land remains used for agricultural purposes. Under this agreement, the contract would have expired around 2013. Well, this is 2014. So maybe this IS an important piece of the puzzle that makes good sense. You can read more about Neverland and the Williamson Act here:

http://mjandjustice4some.blogspot.com/2012/11/neverland-protected-by-williamson-act.html

The irony is that when the above blog post was written, in 2012, there was much optimism that the estate would reapply for the Williamson Act when it expired. Apparently, however, upon the contract’s expiration, the decision was made not to reapply. If we go back to why Michael ever agreed to tie this asset up with Colony Capital in the first place-especially under the terms that he did-we have to remember that dying and leaving it all behind for others to unravel probably wasn’t exactly in his plan. Tom Barrack supposedly said to him when the idea was proposed, “Don’t have me do this…unless you’re really interested in building a program going forward to create some revenue for yourself.”

Message Of Welcome Carved By Michael
Message Of Welcome Carved By Michael

Michael obviously had high hopes-right up to the very last-that he could generate the revenue again to somehow make everything turn out all right. At the very least, he probably looked at Neverland as an asset that would benefit his children one day. But it is also possible that he was thinking about the potential revenue he could generate for himself, in his own lifetime, by maintaining control of this asset. Even if Michael never set foot on the property again, he could still generate a sizeable yearly income just from leasing it-a practice he had actually been doing, under the radar, for years. Here is a video clip where he discusses (besides Marc Schaffel) the leasing of Neverland property to local cattle farmers:

[tube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0qfBB0Rnjg[/tube]

There are some reports claiming that Michael understood, from the get go, that the intent was to ultimately sell, but that with an estimated $70 to $80 million to be gleaned from such a sale after renovations and increased property values, it would have been quite a financial windfall for him-and his children. I don’t know if there is any truth to those reports, and I tend to believe Michael’s words that he would never sell Neverland. Whatever the case, Michael’s untimely death changed the game plan considerably. But what about Tom Barrack, the man who agreed to “bail” Michael out in 2008? Back in 2010, I did an in-depth post on Barrack and Neverland when an article ran in “New York” about Barrack’s partnership with Rob Lowe and the business of investing in “distressed celebrities.” Unfortunately, just as with everything I wrote prior to 2011, that post is currently inaccessible, but the “New York” article on which I based it is still available. While the article did a good job of humanizing Barrack and letting us get to know the man beneath the “gleaming” bald dome, it also left no doubt that, for Barrack, this was all part of a successful business model built on the idea of investing in “artificially depressed” celebrities and properties.  The following passage is excerpted from Benjamin Wallace’s “New York” article:

Over the past two years, Barrack has been lining up deals that target celebrities and entertainment properties whose value he believes to be artificially depressed. In some cases, that’s because they haven’t yet figured out a way to monetize their assets. But mostly it’s because the investment is, in the classic sense, distressed—individuals like Jackson or Annie Leibovitz whose financial mismanagement has obscured their future revenue potential, or properties like the Miramax film library, which Disney is unloading at a time when no one can agree on what a studio archive is worth. This summer, Barrack created a new $500 million media-and-entertainment investment fund, working with his friend Rob Lowe, who is a partner in the fund. Together they have been on something of a shopping spree—and generating a little tabloid coverage while they’re at it. In one TMZ appearance, a paparazzo’s telephoto captured Lowe and Barrack, shirtless, checking their BlackBerrys on a yacht in the Mediterranean. In a second, the two men were video-ambushed as they entered the Mayfair restaurant C London for dinner with owner Giuseppe Cipriani and Formula One’s Flavio Briatore. Barrack has explained the timing of his new direction by musing publicly that some of the investment sectors in which he amassed his wealth can no longer generate extraordinary returns. The world right now is “an environment that has very little visibility, and whatever you guess will surely be wrong the next day,” he says, glancing at his BlackBerry. “Everybody has been abjectly wrong if they’re trying to make macro bets.” The only thing to do is position yourself for opportunities—stand in the stream and wait for fish to swim between your legs. That’s how the Neverland—(At this point in the conversation, Barrack was interrupted by the arrival of his partner Rob Lowe).

You can read more of the article here:

http://nymag.com/news/business/69782/

I suppose there are two ways one could look at Barrack’s practice. Some might call it savvy business dealing (and after all, isn’t taking advantage of opportunity part of every successful business model?). However, it could also be viewed another way as well-that is, simply taking advantage. And taking advantage of someone who has fallen onto hardship-however temporarily–is certainly not the most ethical practice in the world. In Wallace’s piece, it isn’t exactly made secret that Barrack’s modus operandi is to take advantage of distressed situations with an eye towards the profit they will eventually turn. It doesn’t make Barrack a crook, necessarily, but the point is that just because something is legal doesn’t make it ethical. The tragedy is that Michael-and Neverland-was ever put into such a vulnerable position to begin with, and for that, the real blame must go all the way back to Tom Sneddon. Today, the property for which Barrack initially invested $23. 5 million is guaranteed to fetch him anywhere from $50 million on the lower end of the spectrum, to $70-$80 million on its highest end. That should be good for at least an additional yacht or two to sail on the Mediterranian. The upside of the situation is that a sale on the higher end will probably guarantee Michael’s kids at least a $20 to $30 million windfall, once Colony Capital takes their end. But as some sources have reported, a sale on the lower end could possibly mean they end up with nothing. However, this is not really an issue of what will line the children’s pockets. Michael’s children are already wealthy. It’s an issue of losing something that may be far more valuable to them than money-their link to their childhood and that magical, wonderful kingdom he created. But there is another reason why Neverland may hold special sentimental value for them. It was much more than just their childhood home. It was the only permanent home they ever shared with their father. It was the last place they could ever truly call “home.” The tragedy for the fans in the loss of Neverland is nothing compared to the tragedy this must be for them. Perhaps, again, not so much for what it is-or was-as for what it represents. Had Michael lived, they might have been content to move on, because any home they eventually made with him-whether it be “Wonderland” or elsewhere-would have been “home.” But as it stands, Neverland has probably loomed large in their imaginations as a connection to a time and place when life was much more innocent, fun, and happier-and, of course, magical. But the subtitle of this post is: What does this mean for us? And that is where I would truly like to focus. Several months ago, someone kindly sent me two leaves from Neverland.  I assume they must have come from a tree on the property. I sat for quite some time before beginning this piece, inhaling their woodsy fragrance and hoping to draw from their essence the inspiration on how to even begin to assess how I feel about this news. I try to look at it from all angles; to keep my balance in perspective, but I cannot overcome the empty sadness.

 

neverland4Even though we know that “Neverland,” as such, really died in 2003, and has stood mostly as an empty, abandoned shell since 2005, there was still the comfort of knowing it was “there”; that it was still a part of Michael, still in his name, and that any time one felt up to making the pilgrimage to the gates, they would still be there (for me, this has been on my “bucket list” for over five years). As long as the property remained in limbo, there was always the hope that something good might come of it. There had been talk of many proposed projects and ideas-a museum, a Graceland-like mecca for fans, a state park, an art school for teens, even a children’s hospital (though I don’t know how seriously the latter was ever really proposed). In the end, as we have been told over and over, none of these ideas have proven “feasible” given the reality of Neverland’s zoning and geographic location. “Los Olivas isn’t exactly Memphis,” Zach O’Malley Greenburg has stated, and he’s right. Graceland is situated in a wonderfully convenient location adjacent to the interstate, just a few miles south of downtown Memphis. It is a location that can easily accomodate the many thousands of visitors Graceland receives per year. That being said, however, there are many such rurally located tourist attractions that manage to do quite well. The D.H. Lawrence ranch in Taos, New Mexico comes to mind (and it, too, requires a trek up some very treacherous mountain roads) but I don’t think we can even begin to compare the number of average visitors to a place like the D.H. Lawrence ranch to that which would descend upon Neverland, should those gates become open to the public. But I honestly do not think most Michael Jackson fans are really concerned that the place become some huge commercial asset-in fact, most would probably prefer that it remain exactly what it is at present, even if going there must feel a bit like visiting a ghost place. That is, a quiet and tranquil place where Michael’s spiritual aura can still be felt. For most of us, that is enough. But apparently, the estate can only see the viability of hanging onto Neverland if it is generating a profit. This is what I really read between the lines of their statement. In saying every option had been exhausted, it seems what they are really saying is that every feasible option to turn Neverland into something viably commercial and profitable had been exhausted. So, in the end, I suppose, it must have come down to a choice: Either to hang onto something of great sentimental and historical value to the estate, at the cost of draining the estate’s resources, or to let it go. Apparently, they made their decision but I think it is a huge mistake. Understand that even though I’m not an estate hater, I am also not one who blindly accepts their every decision without question, and I believe those questions do need to be raised, especially when we look at the implications of what is potentially going to be lost IF this sale goes through.

neverland3

They like to to tell us that the business of an estate is to generate money and to protect its assets for the heirs. It is true that an estate must make money. But they also have a responsibility for protecting and preserving the historical legacy, especially when we are talking the estate of one of the most culturally iconic performers of our time. To be sure, having Neverland sold might not exactly be the end of the world as we know it. As some have said, it may all depend, ultimately, on who buys it. Yes, it “could” end up in the hands of some very benevolent benefactor who will fully understand and respect its legacy and importance to fans-or, at least, its importance to his kids, which is really what should be our utmost concern. It would be wonderful to think that someone might buy the place who would actually consider opening it up to fans, or giving us that museum (though, no shocker, that would probably end in a lawsuit with the estate!). I even heard one very ingenious idea of turning it into a bed and breakfast establishment. I’m sure that would be a windfall for anyone, with guaranteed bookings up to ten years in advance! (And, heck, there ought to be enough guest cottages on the property to make it a perfectly feasible idea! And imagine…for an extra fee, getting Michael’s master bedroom!).

neverland8Over time, there have been rumors of many celebrities, from Justin Bieber to Lady Gaga, who have reportedly been interested in purchasing Neverland. I can’t really imagine Justin Bieber, after all of his antics, being a viable candidate (I am sure the neighbors of Los Olivas would probably be none too thrilled!) but Lady Gaga, I am sure, would at least respect the property’s connection to Michael. But while it would be wonderful to envision such a “best case” scenario, the simple truth is that we have no such guarantees. The new owners might be people who would care about and respect the property’s legacy.

But then again, they might not. What if Neverland falls into the hands of someone who could care less about Michael Jackson or his fans, and in fact, would do everything in their power to strip and dismantle all reminders of Sycamore Valley Ranch as the infamous Neverland? I am sure that, for many of us, that is our worst nightmare scenario-the idea of Neverland being taken over by some indifferent or cold hearted individual who would strip away all physical reminders and ties to “Neverland.” Even if Barrack has worked hard to restore Neverland to its “former glory” and has respected Michael’s vision, as he claims, that is no guarantee that any new owner will feel an obligation to do likewise. Imagine the beautiful flower gardens gone; the clocks taken down; the Giving Tree perhaps chopped down, and cattle grazing where the Ferris wheel once stood. Imagine those magical gates being torn down to make room for something else-a new, much colder, and more imposing barrier that says nothing. The scary thing is that we simply don’t know. The above scenario is certainly the worst case scenario, but it could happen, and there are no guarantees that it won’t. But even if Neverland is lucky and does fall into the hands of an owner who respects and values it as Michael Jackson’s home, it doesn’t change the fact that Neverland will no longer be in Michael Jackson’s name. It will no longer be under the control and protection of his estate; it will no longer belong to the family. And that, for me, is the saddest part of all. Neverland-if for nothing else, its historical value-should remain in the control of the estate. For me, it simply isn’t good enough to “hope and trust” that the new owners will respect and honor the property’s legacy. Does anyone think that Elvis Presley’s estate would simply “hope and trust” that someone would come along to take care of Graceland? Recently, a petition has begun circulating on Change.org to save Neverland. Although I am somewhat skeptical about the success of petitions, I signed it in the spirit that no turn should be left unturned. This is what I commented:

It is important that Neverland be kept within the control of the estate and of Michael’s heirs. It is much too important a part of his legacy to be turned over to other hands. Even if the future owner(s) were to honor the home’s legacy, there are no guarantees once it is passed on to the hands of others. It could end up going through countless owners, who no doubt over time will chip away until there is nothing of Michael left. The Neverland property has just as much historical value as Hayvenhurst, if not more. Michael composed many of his biggest hits on its spiritual grounds, in his beloved Given Tree. And yes, it became tainted over time but even that sad history, too, is part of the historical legacy of NL and vital for future generations to understand not only Michael’s great vision for healing children, but what he had to sacrifice and endure as well. Nothing represents the full breadth and scope of Michael’s magic, endurance, trials and tribulations like the 2700 acres of NL. Those acres are the heart of Michael; to sell it is like ripping the heart from him, more surely than the coroner’s scalpel. Consider: Michael went from a 3-room house in Gary to Neverland. There is nothing else-no other home or landmark-that physically commemorates this achievement Hayvenhurst, after all, belonged to all the Jacksons. Neverland was not only Michael’s one and only permanent home, it was his own creation.

To sign the petition to save Neverland:

http://www.change.org/petitions/the-estate-of-michael-jackson-don-t-sell-neverland?recruiter=1776996&utm_campaign=signature_receipt&utm_medium=email&utm_source=share_petition

There have been many similar “Save Neverland” campaigns and petitions started in the past. I found a few such petitions on Google, all from several years back, many with as few as a little over a hundred signatures. But now it seems there is a new sense of urgency; a sense that “this is it.” The reality is looming that Neverland could indeed really be gone forever now. This petition alone has garnered over FOUR THOUSAND  signatures and counting, not to mention that many others have started up as well.

neverland gates
There Is A Sense Of Urgency This Time, A Sense That Neverland May Indeed Be Gone Forever

To expand further on my comment,  Neverland not only stands to this day as the only permanent home that Michael Jackson ever owned, it is also the only truly physical testament to what he accomplished in going from that tiny, three room house in Gary, Indiana to a 2700 acre estate. It is, in fact, an insult to both Michael’s memory and to his accomplishments to even insinuate that Hayvenhurst is more worthy of preservation than Neverland. They should both be maintained, but again, it is Neverland that represents the “totality” of who Michael was. Over the past two days I have heard many arguments and reasons as to how we should view the potential sale and loss of Neverland. All of them have validity to some degree. Some feel that Michael set the example when he walked away from Neverland and (presumably) never looked back. And there is something to be said for the ability to just “let go.” The reality is that Neverland has sat as an abandoned shell for over six years. But although I have not been to Neverland personally, I have been told that its energy can still be felt. And I believe this very strongly, as it is part of my own Cherokee belief and my knowledge that Neverland is indeed sacred ground. It was sacred ground for thousands of years before Michael ever sat foot on it, as it was a place that Chumash Indians used for ceremonial grounds. But Michael definitely left the stamp of his own energy and presence there. Part of my personal Cherokee belief is that spirits never completely disconnect from earth or from their physical embodiment. Spirits will always maintain a connection to the places where they were happiest. If the property is taken over by someone else, it won’t take away the fact that Michael’s energy and presence is there. But over time, that energy will become diluted and dispersed, especially if it senses it is no longer welcome there. As so many have sadly noted for the past five years, one of the most tragic aspects of being a Michael Jackson fan is the fact that we have no real “center” where we can come together to feel his presence. Forest Lawn is where his body lies, but it’s not where his spirit dwells.

Where does Michael’s spirit reside, really? It is an impossible question to answer. If you are Christian, you may say he is in Heaven, or whatever is your spiritual equivalent. For most of us, we can say that he exists in our hearts, and that Neverland as a concept is something that no one can put up for sale.  So if Neverland as an idea-as a place that lives in our hearts-cannot be taken away, is it worth it to fight for an empty house and a couple thousand acres of land that even Michael himself had not set foot on for years?
Neverland2019

That may depend on personal view. I have been in a few of the same places that Michael has been. I can say I have been inside the same hotel room that he once stayed in. I sat on a bed he slept in, but other than the bragging rights of being able to say I sat on Michael Jackson’s bed, I can say it pretty much felt just like any ordinary bed. There was no “magic dust” that rolled off the sheets; no fairy dust under the pillows. I have even ridden his Ferris wheel from Neverland, and presumably sat in his favorite seat (No. 13)-at least so they told me. It was exciting, but again, having my rump on the same spot where Michael’s rump once sat still did not impart anything extraordinary or magical. It felt like any, ordinary Ferris wheel seat.

I try now to apply this same common sense logic to Neverland. It was just a house he lived in; the grounds were just grounds he once walked on. But we all know, Neverland was so much more than that. Neverland was Michael.

The analogy I used-likening it to the moment when his heart was removed by the autopsy scalpel-may be unpleasantly graphic for some, but I stand by it. For me, that is an apt analogy as the sale of Neverland is exactly just that.

I can’t say I am totally shocked by this turn of events. I think a lot of us had seen it coming for years, but like everyone, I held out hope that eventually Neverland might be used for some good purpose that, of course, would honor Michael’s vision for it. As crass as it sounds, I always loved the idea of making it into a “Graceland” so that it would become accessible to everyone who wished to visit. But I would have been equally happy to see it become an art school or something equally productive-again, as long as it was within keeping with Michael’s original vision for the place. That could encompass a wide range, from recreational fun to spiritual healing.

I suppose the worst thing it could do would be to sit, abandoned. But there are some who say even that is not a bad thing. In the quiet stillness of its abandonment, one can still go there and find it a peaceful place to meditate, and to connect with Michael’s spirit.

neverland9
Not everything can have a dollar price. I feel the estate has dropped the ball on this one.  But I also have to admit that if I were pressed to ask what else should they have done-and how to offer up realistic solutions for this dilemma-I am not sure I would have those answers, either. Not without a lot of thought. I see and hear all of the well intentioned fan initiatives to “buy back Neverland.” I know such initiatives are well intentioned, but the reality is that unless a fan just happens to be a multi millionaire, it is doomed to fail. However,  I just feel that selling it shouldn’t have to be that answer. And I am not consoled by reminders of saving Hayvenhurst, or the success of Michael Jackson One. New albums and Cirque du Soleil shows will come and go. They are exciting in their way. But all pale when compared to the immanence of Neverland, and what it represents. Those artificial gates in the One and Immortal shows will never compensate for the loss of the real thing.

Yes, it is possible that something good may come out of this. But it will not be the same. It is what Shakespeare meant by a “sea change.” Neverland will be transformed. In the best case scenario, we will still recognize it, and let’s hope that is the case. But the reality is that it could become something completely unrecognizable. I am reminded again of the climactic scene from Ghosts where Michael slowly disintegrates into nothingness. His legacy is not going to die, but it sometimes seems, just as with his physical remains, that much of what he left is slowly turning to dust.
[tube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEk6-Z1yqiw[/tube]

Some will say it should not matter, as long as the music survives, and maybe the short films. But that is still only a part of Michael Jackson’s legacy, and maybe not even the most important part. The real essence of who Michael was-the father, the humanitarian, the man with a grand vision for himself, for the world, and its possibilities-is embodied by the grounds of Neverland.

It’s not to say we will lose the spirit and essence of Michael without Neverland. But it may be important to note that what we will lose is the closest physical representation of it that we have.

That is something worth thinking about. And yes, it should matter to all of us who care about him. No exceptions.
ETA (08/04/14): I saw this shared on Twitter last night, and found it so sickening that I wanted to also share it here (not that I enjoy sharing sickening things, that is, but sometimes they are necessary). It’s no secret that Barrack and Colony Capital have been leasing Neverland’s grounds for some time, usually for short term events such as meetings and weddings. I have not found anything that states that they are not within their legal rights to do so, as per the terms of the agreement but, if nothing else, this hits home the reality of what is happening-and will continue to happen, especially as the property goes on the market. Neverland is being invaded by people who have NO RESPECT for anything it stands for, as evidenced by the snarky comment below from a Miss Lauren Roxborough. “Happy Easter from the creepiest place on earth!” she mockingly and proudly tweeted, after being allowed privileged access onto those sacred grounds (and not just sacred because Michael lived there-Neverland has been sacred ground for thousands of years to the indigenous people of Santa Ynez Valley). It sickens me to think of disrespectful trespassers like this woman being allowed to walk the grounds of Neverland. But this may be only a hint of what the future holds for Neverland once it is gone, and no longer in the control of people who care about its legacy. I am not posting this here to stir bad feelings, or to rub salt in the wound, but rather, to show the reality of Neverland’s present and the possible reality of its future. I would rather see the gates closed permanently and the house razed to the ground than to have people like this in it.

More On Auctions: Understanding The Enormity Of What Has Been Lost, and WILL Be Lost-Forever

“We want a Permanent Museum for Michael Jackson!”

This is the rallying cry of a group working hard to try to get the estate to come to a deal with Michael Bush (Michael Jackson’s longtime costume designer and friend) to place the items in his enormous collection in a proposed permanent museum in Las Vegas, rather than allowing them to go beneath the auction block of Julien’s as have so many, many other of Michael’s most iconic as well as personal items. But time is running out. The auction is scheduled to begin November 30th.

Michael Bush Spent Almost 30 Years Dressing MJ-Including The Most Heartwrenching “Performance” Of All When He Dressed Him For The Final Time And Lifted His Body Into The Casket.

I don’t wish to turn this into a bashfest against Michael Bush, who I believe sincerely loved Michael dearly. Maybe he needs the money. But all the more reason why the estate should just work with him to make a deal and have the items on permanent display for all fans to enjoy. Heck, the revenue that such a museum could generate ought to pay for itself many times over! What continues to boggle my mind is why this has yet to be done; why so many of those who are in a position to make this happen seem so reluctant to the idea and/or have dragged their heels for so long, and most importantly, why is the legacy of Michael Jackson continuing to be sold off, piece by piece and scattered to the winds? To make an analogy, think of Michael’s legacy as a huge mountain (which it is!). But now imagine what happens to even the mightiest of mountains over time, as wind and water and other elements do their part in eroding it. Little by little, over time, the mountain is eroded away. At the very least, it becomes irrevocably altered, to something usually much inferior. What is currently being allowed to happen to Michael’s cultural legacy-via those iconic items associated with him-isn’t much different. Once items go into the hands of private collectors, they are as good as lost, for certainly they won’t be seen by the masses again-until and unless such time as that individual decides to give them up. But when that happens, it’s usually only for the purpose of being sold or auctioned off to yet another private collector. Again. And again. And then, what happens to these pieces if, say, that person passes on? Eventually, as precious items are handed down, sold and re-sold, their value becomes tarnished (too much wear and tear; too many exchanging of hands) until, finally, they risk becoming lost altogether, or too damaged to be of any lasting or practical value to anyone. And, as has been pointed out mny times, most of these items are not being bought by true fans or friends who will appreciate their true historical, cultural, or sentimental value. Rather, they are being bought up by rich businessmen who will simply re-sell them for profit first chance they get.

This is the fate that is happening to Michael Jackson’s most iconic costumes-those very items that we cherish in our collective memory as part of our culture and our growing up.

If you go to this group’s Facebook page, you can get a good sense of what has already been lost through the years:

http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/We-want-a-Permanent-Museum-for-Michael-Jackson/428569780513190

I will excerpt just a few highlights from their page here, all under the rather morbid but truthful heading “Gone Forever!” because…well, that’s what they are.

 

GONE FOREVER!

A black wool single-button front closure suit jacket , a custom red vinyl costume shirt with Velcro closures and bodysuit style bottom with a sewn on black tie. Shirt shows evidence of wear and makeup residue at neck. Auctioned and sold for $ 250,920.00

Auctioned and sold for $120,000.00

Photo: A custom created black suit jacket with single snap front closure lined in colorful African style fabric and covered in custom vermicelli beading. The jacket was created by Jackson's personal costumers and contains a Dennis Tompkins and Michael Bush label. The jacket also features a prominent rhinestone crown over crest brooch at left chest. Jackson wore this jacket during his 1997 primetime interview with Barbara Walters.</p><br /><br /><br /><br /> <p>Auctioned and sold for $120,000.00
Michael Jackson “Scream” shirt sold for $72,000 on June 25,2011
Photo: Michael Jackson "Scream" shirt sold for $72,000 on June 25,2011
Michael Jackson Black Glove and Arm Brace Worn During the “HIStory” Tour Sold for $216,000.00 on Oct. 10,2009
Photo: Michael Jackson Black Glove and Arm Brace Worn During the “HIStory” Tour</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> <p>Sold for $216,000.00 on Oct. 10,2009

Michael Jackson Original Pen on Paper Mickey Mouse “Bad” Drawing Sold for $56,250.00 on Nov. 21,2009
Photo: Michael Jackson Original Pen on Paper Mickey Mouse “Bad” Drawing </p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> <p>Sold for $56,250.00 on Nov. 21,2009

The iconic Michael Jackson Video Worn “Thriller” Jacket. Any takers? Too bad, it’s already been sold for $1.8 Million. http://www.contactmusic.com/news/michael-jacksons-belongings-fetch-big-money-at-auction_1277489Photo: The iconic Michael Jackson Video Worn "Thriller" Jacket. Any takers? Too bad, it's already been sold for $1.8 Million. </p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> <p>http://www.contactmusic.com/news/michael-jacksons-belongings-fetch-big-money-at-auction_1277489
We all know that Michael was a bad driver. 😉 😉 ( but a still good looking one! )Here’s Michael in his 1985 Mercedes-Benz 500 SEL. Sold for $104,550.00 on Nov. 21,2009
Photo: We all know that Michael was a bad driver. ;) ;) ( but a still good looking one! )Here's Michael in his 1985 Mercedes-Benz 500 SEL.</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> <p>Sold for $104,550.00 on Nov. 21,2009

 

Michael Jackson’s White Glove From Historic Motown 25 Performance in 1983. Sold for $420,000.00 on Nov. 21,2009

  • Photo: Michael Jackson's White Glove From Historic Motown 25 Performance in 1983. </p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> <p>Sold for $420,000.00 on Nov. 21,2009

 

This iconic performance shirt that MJ wore during the Motown 25th Anniversary was sold for $61,200 on June 25, 2011.
Photo: This iconic performance shirt that MJ wore during the Motown 25th Anniversary was sold for $61,200 on June 25, 2011.

From Narrator: “Michael Jackson’s memorabilia hits the auction block at Planet Hollywood in Las Vegas just “A DAY” after his death.” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrmvSy8xefs
Michael Jackson Auction Prices Soar
Lyrics from Bad album, glove and paintings in Elvis, Marilyn Monroe sale.
Silver MTV Moonman award on round metal base with plaque reading in full, “Video Music Award 1994-1995 Best Dance Video Roger Davies Michael Jackson & Janet Jackson ‘Scream’.” 12 1/4 inches Auctioned and sold for $ 43,750.00
  • Photo: Silver MTV Moonman award on round metal base with plaque reading in full, "Video Music Award 1994-1995 Best Dance Video Roger Davies Michael Jackson & Janet Jackson 'Scream'." 12 1/4 inches</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> <p>Auctioned and sold for $ 43,750.00

Auctioned by Julien’s for $70,400
Photo: Auctioned by Julien's for $70,400
  • If the Estate had purchased this from the seller to put in an MJ Museum, wouldn’t it be great to be able to see a piece of History?
    Photo: Winning bid - $56,250.00
    Photo: Singing Billie Jean during the Victory Tour 1984
    Photo: Winning bid- $68,750.00

    Sold for $10,000. An RIAA platinum record award presented to Michael Jackson to commemorate the sale of more than 1,000,000 copies of the Epic Records single Thriller. 17 by 13 inches
  • Photo: Sold for $10,000.</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> <p>An RIAA platinum record award presented to Michael Jackson to commemorate the sale of more than 1,000,000 copies of the Epic Records single Thriller. 17 by 13 inches

MJ’s own handwritten song lyrics. Winning bid is $10,000.00 Pencil on paper, Michael Jackson handwritten lyrics for the song “An Innocent Man.”  Written on the back of a “Song Packet Info” sheet, this song was written by Jackson in 1993 …

at the height of his sexual abuse controversy.  The lyrics read in part, “If they won’t take me in Cairo then lord where will I go.  I’ll die a man without a country and only god knew I was innocent now.”  16 by 13 1/2 inches, framed

See More

Photo: MJ's own handwritten song lyrics. </p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> <p>Winning bid is $10,000.00</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> <p>Pencil on paper, Michael Jackson handwritten lyrics for the song "An Innocent Man."  Written on the back of a "Song Packet Info" sheet, this song was written by Jackson in 1993 at the height of his sexual abuse controversy.  The lyrics read in part, "If they won't take me in Cairo then lord where will I go.  I'll die a man without a country and only god knew I was innocent now."  16 by 13 1/2 inches, framed

A portrait of famous pop culture figures wearing Michael Jackson sunglasses and his signature white glove. The figures include the Mona Lisa, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, E.T., and Albert Einstein. This was last seen in Neverland. Sold for $66,406.25 on June 24, 2010
  • Photo: A portrait of famous pop culture figures wearing Michael Jackson sunglasses and his signature white glove. The figures include the Mona Lisa, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, E.T., and Albert Einstein. This was last seen in Neverland.</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> <p>Sold for $66,406.25 on June 24, 2010

  • Michael Jackson Clothes And Other Stuff
    The clothes we all know and loved on Michael…The shiny gloves,the black hats,the gold pants,the white socks….all his famous outfits are in this video and…

  • Michael almost had his belongings auctioned for financial reasons but changed his mind two months before he passed away. Let us make sure that all his belongings that meant so much to him remain intact and preserved in an MJ Museum. Pls. like our page to help us make this happen!!!
  • Michael Jackson Auction
    MICHAEL JACKSON’S TREASURES FROM NEVERLAND Peek inside the private world of the late King of Pop when we glimpse treasures from Michael Jackson’s Neverland R…

  • Auctioned and sold by Julien’s for $31, 250.00.
  • Photo: Auctioned and sold by Julien's for $31, 250.00.

  • Michael Jackson Original Drawing   Sold for $30,000 on June 25, 2010
    Photo: Michael Jackson Original Drawing</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> <p> Sold for $30,000 on June 25, 2010

  • Auctioned by Julien’s for $70,400
An original Charlie Chaplin sketch by MJ, auctioned and sold by Julien’s for $34,375. Why can’t this be placed in an MJ Museum?
Photo: An original Charlie Chaplin sketch by MJ, auctioned and sold by Julien's for $34,375. Why can't this be placed in an MJ Museum?

As for myself personally, I’m not so much concerned about things like cars as I am Michael’s wardrobe-those famous and iconic outfits that he wore for his videos and stage performances. But also, items such as his personal artwork, lyrics, and awards won deserve to either be placed in a permanent museum or at the very least, given to his children.
Now that we’ve had a look at what is already gone forever, let’s have a look at what WILL be gone forever come December 3rd-if nothing is done!
Sale highlights include a 30th Anniversary of Madison Square Garden show signed prototype helmet which was wired to illuminate a row of battery powered lights below the visor. The helmet is signed in black marker to designer Michael Bush and states “To Bush Love Michael Jackson,” and Jackson’s “Scream” video costume which includes a pair of black spandex pants with matching long sleeve shirt and mesh tuck strap. Each costume piece is marked on the interior in gold marker “2/2” or “2/2 M.J.J,” indicating that two costumes were created for Jackson’s famous video shoot. Michael Jackson’s Captain EO white spandex shirt featuring ribbed neck, zip closure and a rainbow motif is also included as well as the King of Pop’s Awards Ceremony jacket which is a black wool jacket embellished with red armband, gold tone metal floral buttons, metallic embroidered crown patch at chest and buckled leather straps at right shoulder. Jackson wore this jacket when he attended the 3rd annual Soul Train Awards in 1989 where he was honored with the Sammy Davis, Jr. Heritage Award, the Heritage Award for Career Achievement and awards for his single and video for “Man in the Mirror.”

 

From the Julienne’s Idols and Icons exhibit last May. Exhibits I have no quarrel with. These items DESERVE to be seen. But when it comes to Julienne’s, an “exhibit” is nothing more than a display of the goods. It’s the same thing they do in Wal-Mart to get you to buy what’s on the shelf! Imagine going in the Smithsonian Institute and finding a price tag on Orville and Wilbur Wright’s airplane! Is this any different?

This was a poignant passage from Latoya’s book Starting Over. It is a passage that is also featured on the “We Want A Permanent Museum For Michael Jackson” Facebook page:

“Despite all of this licensing, I could not even have a few of Michael’s personal photos of him and me, just to have them hanging up in my house so I can be surrounded by happier memories of my brother. ” Absolutely not,” I was told. I become incredibly sad whenever I think about everything that has been taken from the family. The worst part is that th…

e trustees have never asked the children if they want anything what once belonged to their father. I can’t imagine that the trustees ever will. I know Paris would love to have some keepsakes from her father, or anything, for that matter. Michael’s estate has begun selling off large numbers of his possessions at auction, including everything from his furniture and memorabilia to his handwritten notes. Because I miss my brother so much, I want a few mementos of him, and with the family denied access to his personal belongings, I have sent Jeffre and others to auctions several times on my behalf to buy pieces that Michael and I picked out together, pieces that have significant sentiment for me. I cannot bring myself to go in person because I feel too embarrassed that I am being forced to purchase my own brother’s possessions.”-Latoya Jackson
This passage is a very sad but real reminder of the very unique dynamic that exists between the Jackson family and the estate. It also reminds me of why I so often find myself divided when it comes to issues concerning the estate. If one were to ask, do I think they’re doing a good job at managing Michael’s money, business interests, and post-mortem “career” then I would say yes. But still…there is something undeniably very wrong with this picture when a family cannot have access to their own brother’s and son’s personal belongings, in some instances even the very things they may have given him themselves! I really believe the family should have access to those items. They shouldn’t have to stoop to the level of having to attend auctions-or sending others to attend auctions-just to bid on their own brother’s/son’s things.

Where does respect for Michael as a business “entity” and as a father, son, brother, and husband begin? And when it comes to the business entity end of things, where do we separate the corporate end from the need to preserve a cultural legacy for future generations to appreciate?

Perhaps I’m just naive or incredibly idealistic, but I believe a compromise could be reached that would be a win-win for everyone. A permanent museum may not satisfy the instant need for cash, but over time, it could certainly generate enough in tourism dollars to pay for itself many times over. Why can’t the estate simply pay Mr. Bush what the collection is worth, and put the collection in the permanent museum in Las Vegas (or wherever, ultimately, the museum turns out to be?). Yes, a lot of Michael’s costumes and personal possessions have already fallen into the hands of private collectors, and there isn’t much that can be done about that. But there is still a lot of stuff left that could be salvaged for fans to enjoy now and in the future, and more importantly, for his children to have.

As for the charities that would benefit from this auction, could they not just as easily benefit from the proceeds of a permanent museum?

If you feel as strongly about this issue as I do, please take a moment and sign this petition! Petitions don’t always work-true-but they certainly can’t hurt, and at the very least, they send a strong message that this is an issue that people care about greatly.

On a cheerier note, Michael Bush’s book King of Style: Dressing Michael Jackson comes out at the end of October!

UPDATE: (10/05/12): If you are in the UK and interested in seeing the Michael Jackson Tompkins-Bush exhibit, here is a link with that information: http://uk.westfield.com/stratfordcity/

URGENT! This Important Petition Is Still Short Of Its 3,000 Goal!

Today is the day William Wagener is due in court to present his affidavit requesting a criminal investigation into Tom Sneddon and his conduct during the 2005 trial of Michael Jackson. At present, the petition is still roughly about 200 signatures short. Please take a moment to go to the link and sign!

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/662/053/218/support-of-affidavit-concerning-criminal-conduct-of-tom-sneddon-2005-michael-jackson-trial/

[tube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lVak-gVDgvE&feature=youtu.be[/tube]